It is a question a problem drinker might ask and then immediately list the reasons why it cannot be true.

To help people come to their own conclusions regarding a problem with alcohol, A.A. offers a self-assessment tool, “Is A.A. for You?” It includes twelve questions to help an individual decide whether to give A.A. a try.

Alcoholism is a disease that is no respecter of age, varying abilities, creed, race, gender, wealth, occupation, or education. Our experience shows that anyone can be an alcoholic. And, beyond question, anyone who wants to stop drinking is welcome in A.A.

The book Alcoholics Anonymous shares what many people with a drinking problem have found to be a helpful idea: that if, when you honestly want to, you find you cannot quit entirely, or if when drinking, you have little control over the amount you take, you might have a drinking problem. The good news is that A.A. offers a solution to those who are seeking help.

A.A. works together with professionals who can guide a client who might have a drinking problem toward A.A.’s program of recovery in their local state or province.

One member shares, “When I was ready to do something about my drinking, I went to visit a counselor with my employer’s assistance program. I told them the truth about how I was drinking. This professional said, ‘You might want to give A.A. a try; it might work for you.’ The thought that crossed my desperate mind was, It has to work for me. And it has.”

Others find their own way to A.A. by using the Internet. Curious about alcoholism or a drinking problem, they come upon our website, aa.org, where they can find information on A.A. or search for an A.A. meeting nearby.

If you have a drinking problem, A.A. may be able to help — whether in person or online. For more information, contact the Public Information desk at the General Service Office at publicinfo@aa.org or (212) 870-3119.

To find an A.A. meeting, download the  A.A.W.S. Meeting Guide app

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